Do Winners Ever Quit

Post 1003

A common success myth is that winners never quit and quitters never win. It is a favorite with athletic coaches. Is there scientific evidence to support it?

In his insightful book Barking Up the Wrong Tree Eric Barker examines the research on this. He starts Chapter 3 with the story of an impoverished Mexican boy who was inspired to persist. He tried multiple times to cross the US border to find work that would pay better in the US. Despite failed attempts and being caught by border patrol and returned to Mexico he finally made it. He could not speak English but he found work and worked 7 days a week 12 hours a day. He lived at first in his car. He also took classes at a community college at night. With good grades he managed to transfer to the University of California at Barkley. Graduating he was accepted at Harvard Medical School. He married and became a US citizen.

Today, Dr. Q, as he is known. Is one of the top brain surgeons in the US. He performs hundreds of surgeries a year at John Hopkins, one of the top hospitals in the country. There is no doubt that Dr. Q is very intelligent. But it took amazing grit and persistence for this poor immigrant boy from Mexico to become one of the most outstanding brain surgeons in the US.

Dr. Q’s story is very inspiring, but does it typify most people’s experience. Barker’s examination of research on this subject revealed that while persistence is certainly an important element of success it is not a guarantee of success. He cites the work of Howard Gardner who found that ambitious people are usually very persistent but they still do not always succeed. The most successful of them learn from their failures and change their approach.

Angela Duckworth made similar findings in her work that led to her book Grit. She found that people who persevere when things get tough do succeed more often. She counts this perseverance as a critical element of grit – the tendency to work very hard and see things through.

It appears that the research tells us what common sense would tell us (as it so often does): that persistence often leads to success but not always. If we persist in doing the wrong thing or in the wrong way we just persist in failing. Persistence is important to success but so is having a realistic view of what will work and being willing to stop now and then, reassess what we are doing and learn from our mistakes.

Learn how you can achieve more and realize your goals in my book, The Success Essentials.

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

The Power of Habit – Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg

Post 1002

Title and Author:   The Power of Habit – Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg

Synopsis of Content:  

Duhigg explores what science has to teach us about how habits are formed, how they function, how they can be modified and how they influence our lives and our business world. The book is divided into three parts: The Habits of Individuals, The Habits of Successful Organizations, and the Habits of Societies.

Based on studies of animal behavior and human behavior, we (that is rats, monkeys and humans) form habits the same way. There is a cue of some kind that triggers a habit, followed by some form of routine that has been completed memorized and operates more or less automatically, followed by some form of reward that reinforces the habit. Whether it is buckling our seat belt, brushing out teeth, smoking a cigarette or using heroin, this same habit loop operates in all of us.

The brain creates habits because it simplifies our activities. If we had to consciously decide and think out everything we do every day throughout the day from scratch it would be overwhelming for the brain. Habits are little routines that automate aspects of our behavior. We are not usually conscious that the habit is being formed, and once it is in place we need not expend much thought to follow it. It is a very effective efficiency that our minds use to free us up to think about other things.

Since we now know how a habit is formed and how they function we can modify existing habits and create new ones. We must identify the right cue which leads to the desired routine which is then followed by the reward. We must know in advance, or expect, the reward to motivate us to engage in the routine. The reward generates endorphins in the brain which are powerful motivators. They motivate us to repeat the routine every time the cue occurs. It is a bit more complex than that, but that is the gist of it.

Duhigg goes on to explain in fascinating detail how studies have shown us how we can modify a habit and how to replace one habit with another. This is very important because we can learn from it how to replace a bad habit (smoking) with a good one (exercise).

Certain habits also develop in organizations and in societies and they come together to create a culture, whether it is the culture of a corporation or the culture of a society. Culture, it seems, is primarily driven by key habits.

What I found useful about this book:

This book helps us understand how habits are formed and how we can use them to our benefit, change them when we need to and replace them when necessary. Duhigg does warn the reader that although we understand the way habits are made and altered it is not always easy to do it. Determining the actual cue for example can take some experimentation and work.

Readability/Writing Quality:  

The book is very well written. It is engaging. It contains lots of references to studies and science but not in a dry or boring way. It is a series of fascinating stories. It is very well organized.

Notes on Author:  

Charles Duhigg is an award winning investigative reporter for the New York Times.

Other Books by This Author:

Smarter, Faster, Better

Related Website:   

http://charlesduhigg.com/

Three Great Ideas You Can Use:  

  1. Habits all function in the same basic way: a cue begins a behavior routine which ends in a reward. Once we understand this we can understand how habits work and how to change them or use them.
  2. We are manipulated every day by business through habits. Marketing has become in many ways habit focused.
  3. Once we know how to form and change a habit we can gain more real control over our own behaviors; we can replace bad habits and create good ones.

Publication Information:  

Title and Author: The Power of Habit – Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
Copyright holder: ©2012 by Charles Duhigg
Publisher: Random House

Book of the Month: December 2016

 

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

Does Optimism Have a Dark Side?

Aaron Orendorff wrote a provocative post on Mashable last August about the dark side of optimism. It is an article well worth reading. Though it focuses on optimism in business it has applications on all parts of life.

Generally, we think that optimism is a good thing – and it is. Optimistic people are often healthier and live longer. Most successful people are by nature optimists. As Orendorff points out though, just because most successful people are optimists does not mean that most optimists are successful.

Most people, unless they are by nature risk takers, are averse to risk. They fear failure. If they are also by nature optimistic they may minimize the risks out of fear rather than looking realistically at the risk. A failure to be realistic about risk often leads to failure.

Orendorff suggests four steps to guarding against this failure to appreciate risk and allow optimism to lead to failure.

  1. Look into the future and pretend you have failed at whatever you are setting out to accomplish. Then analyze why you failed. What went wrong? This forces us to examine the risks more realistically. The challenge here is not to allow risk aversion to grow too large – if we fear every possible thing that can go wrong we will never start and never finish, and likely never succeed. So this examination of what can go wrong must be balanced with an analysis of what can go right.
  2. Look at the numbers. Analyze whatever you are undertaking in terms of hard cold numbers as often as you can. Look at reliable statistics. Look at how others have failed and why. The lessons from this can be invaluable.
  3. Know your limitations. We all have limitations. There are things we are not good at, there are things we simply cannot do. Failure to realistically examine those limitations can lead to crushing failure.
  4. Avoid surrounding yourself only with optimists. A few pessimists in the mix can be vital to being realistic. If everyone you are working with is an optimist no one may see the risks in a realistic light.

As Orendorff concludes being realistic about optimism does not mean abandoning it. It is about striking a balance between optimism and pessimism. It is about being neither really – it is about being realistic. Too much pessimism can kill any good idea. Too much optimism can as well by leading us down a path to failure. Successful people are more often realistic people. They are motivated by their optimism but are realistic enough to see the risks and evaluate them in a hard-nosed way.

“The pessimist sees only the tunnel; the optimist sees the light at the end of the tunnel; the realist sees the tunnel and the light – and the next tunnel.” – Sydney J. Harris

Aaron Orendorff is the founder of iconiContent and a regular contributor at Entrepreneur, Lifehacker, Fast Company, Business Insider and more. Connect with him about content marketing (and bunnies) on Facebook or Twitter.

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

Smarter, Faster, Better

Post 1000

It is hard for me to believe it but this is the 1000th post to this blog. Actually that is a bit of a cheat because for a number of years the blog had a different name, but it has always been devoted to bringing to my readers book reviews and articles that inform and at times I hope that inspire.

The blog was originally called Creating True Wealth just like my newsletter. By true wealth I mean greater knowledge and understanding about the things that can help you improve yourself just as I strive to improve myself. The blog’s byline is Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development. That has been my vision of true wealth: adapting to change and personal development.

In 2013 I moved all the content of the old blog to this new one and carried on the work.

The first blog entry was in February 2008. So we are coming up on the tenth anniversary of the blog in a couple months.

I sincerely hope you have enjoyed the posts, or at least most of them, and that you have learned a few things from them. If you have I have succeeded in my goal. I would love to hear from you, either by posting a comment here or by sending me an email as indicated below. Let me know if you have found these posts at all useful or beneficial and how I might improve them.

And now to continue my task I include below my review of Smarter, Faster and Better by Charles Duhigg. Keep reading friends and keep learning.
A book review by Daniel R. Murphy

The November 2016 Book of the Month

Title and Author:   Smarter, Faster, Better by Charles Duhigg

Synopsis of Content:  

In this book the author takes a detailed look at the habits and practices that improve personal and team performance. What makes this book stand out are the case studies and the scientific research that is explored. He explores motivation, team work, focus, goal setting, managing others, decision making, innovation and absorbing data in new and insightful ways. This book is not a rehash of the valid but often repeated principles of success. It is an investigation into what has been scientifically demonstrated to enhance success.

He explores the rebelliousness of a retirement home resident, a successful businessman who suffered a rare form of brain damage that changed his brain’s ability to be motivated teaching us how motivation works in the brain. He looks at what motivation lessons come from the military.

What kinds of people make up the ideal team? Should they be alike or diverse? How does diversity in personality types strengthen a team? What have hospitals and airlines learned about team work that can save lives?

How does focus, too much or too little, affect performance? What have we learned from aircraft crashes about how focus and cognitive tunneling can cripple decision making in a crisis? What are mental models and how can they be used by anyone to improve focus and analysis of a difficult situation?

How did a young woman win the National Poker Championship and what did she know about Bayesian psychology that anyone can take advantage of?

What has the business world learned about effective goal setting? How are SMART goals effective and in what ways are they ineffective? What do you have to add to SMART goals to make them more effective?

Duhigg provides insight into all these questions and many more. This book will provide you with a unique and provocative analysis into how we can perform smarter, faster and better.

What I found useful about this book:

Careful analysis of how people perform both on an individual level and as teams has provided us with considerable insight into what works best. While the traditional principles of success remain valid there is more to the story than that.

Readability/Writing Quality:  

The book is very well written and engrossing. It is written as a series of stories that hold attention and teach at the same time.

Notes on Author:  

Charles Duhigg is a Pulitzer prize winning journalist with the New York Times. He is an author who digs deeply into his subjects. He is a graduate of Harvard Business School and Yale College.

Other Books by This Author:

The Power of Habit

Related Website:   

Charlesduhigg.com

Three Great Ideas You Can Use:  

  1. Teams function most effectively when made up of diverse people with different approaches, attitudes and personalities.
  2. Goal setting must be a combination of measurable and achievable goals with stretch goals to prevent limited performance.
  3. By developing a mental model of what we want to achieve we can avoid cognitive tunneling and achieve more.

Publication Information:  

Title and Author: Smarter, Faster, Better by Charles Duhigg
Copyright holder: ©2016 by Charles Duhigg
Publisher: Random House

 

Questions? Comments? I would love to hear from you. Feel free to post your comments or questions below or if you want to contact me privately you can do that here: CONTACT ME HERE.

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

Kaizen

A few days ago I posted on becoming the best at what we do. I talked about constant improvement in what we do and how we do it. The Japanese have a name for this constant improvement: Kaizen. Kaizen involves taking what Thomas Oppong calls baby steps.

On occasion a major change is needed in our work or in our personal lives. An addict must stop abusing alcohol or drugs. The recovery process may involve many steps, but it is still a radical change in their lives. However most of the time we are more successful with gradual change.

Having big audacious goals is OK, in fact it can be inspiring. Olympic athletes do not set little goals – their goal is to be the best at what they are doing – the best in the whole world. But they get their through small steps – one step at a time – one practice at a time. They may have many intermediate goals – small ones, but they are all aimed at getting them to the big one: the Gold Medal.

We can most effectively improve and change our lives through small steps or incremental change, because they are easier to achieve. You are less likely to become discouraged or overwhelmed if you concentrate on small steps.

As James Clear observes, ““We place unnecessary stress on ourselves to lose weight or to succeed in business or to write a best-selling novel. Instead, you can keep things simple and reduce stress by focusing on the daily process and sticking to your schedule, rather than worrying about the big, life changing goals. When you focus on the practice instead of the performance, you can enjoy the present moment and improve at the same time.”

The concept was used by business in the US during the depression to make small improvements continuously and it helped the US win World War II. The Japanese liked the idea and gave it the name Kaizen.

If you focus on becoming just 1% better at something you take that small step. Continue to focus on making those 1% improvements and over time you can improve 25% and then 50%, etc. Those 1% compound on one another.

Constant improvement can be challenging. We tend to get buried in the daily detail. It is easy to become overwhelmed by all that detail. Problems crop up and need to be addressed. Change is imposed upon us by external forces and cannot be ignored. The boss always wants something. The customers want something. The process we are working requires continuous attention. Emails need to be answered. Phone calls need to be returned. Reports are due. It can be overwhelming.

For me taking a little time each day to see what can be improved, even a little bit, is a relief from that grind of detail. It is what makes work exciting and engaging. Working to improve how you do what you do – becoming more efficient, more effective, is very rewarding work. You must make the time to focus on these improvements, no matter how small they may be. Over time these small improvements add up and change the way we work, improve it. It is the most rewarding part of your work if you exercise the self-discipline to do it.

A little change each day or each week will make a difference over the long run.

Learn how to formulate goals correctly to gain control over your life and achieve your dreams in my book, Goal Power!

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

Drive by Daniel H. Pink

A Book Review by Daniel R. Murphy

Title and Author:  Drive by Daniel H. Pink

Synopsis of Content:

Drive is about what science teaches about motivation, how it differs from mainstream business practices, and how business in the 21st century is and needs to learn from this science to improve employee performance.

Pink characterizes three generations of motivation. Motivation 1.0 is the basic needs motivation: you need food and water and shelter and you will do what you need to in order to secure those things. Motivation 2.0 is the so called carrot and stick motivation techniques business, schools and government have used for centuries: rewarding people with money and other rewards for desirable conduct and punishing with sanctions such as termination from employment for undesirable conduct. Pink argues that Motivation 2.0 is unreliable and inadequate for knowledge workers in the 21st century.

He then describes Motivation 3.0 – engaging people through greater autonomy, mastery and purpose. He demonstrates how the science of psychology has shown this more elegant method of motivation is more consistently effective and far cheaper to provide.

At the end of the book he sets forth a plan on how to implement this new motivational method in an organization.

The book has a broader significance however than just organizational motivation techniques. It teaches the reader how they can best motivate themselves and obtain more from their work by seeking purpose in what they do, developing mastery over what they do and reaping greater satisfaction in the process.

This is an enlightening and important book on many levels.

Readability/Writing Quality:  

Pink’s writing style is easy to follow. While he cites many studies and discusses the science behind his conclusions the book is very engaging and is not as dry as the subject matter might suggest. The chapters are well organized and build upon one another.

Notes on Author:

Daniel H. Pink is the author of A Whole New Mind, a best seller. He is also author of two other best sellers: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko and Free Agent Nation. He lectures on economic transformation and the “new workplace”.

Related Website:

http://www.danpink.com/drive

Three Great Ideas You Can Use:

  1. Traditional motivational techniques in business and education based on carrot and stick approaches are unreliable, especially for the modern knowledge worker. Employers need to learn about engagement motivation and apply it to motivate workers to a higher level of sustained performance.
  2. Engaging people is based on intrinsic motivation rather than the extrinsic motivation of the older carrot and stick approach. While it is more challenging to implement and sustain due to its complexity, it is also more effective.
  3. Rewards narrow our focus causing us to concentrate on getting the reward – this diminishes creative capacity and can dumb down the potential of anyone, even the most gifted or capable.

Publication Information:  

Drive by Daniel H. Pink  (c) 2009. Published by Riverhead Books, Penguin Group. 242 pages hardbound.

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

Becoming the Best

Do you want to become the best at what you do? Not everyone does, which is why there is so much mediocrity out there. If you do want to become the best at what you do it requires constant work – constant improvement in yourself. You can have all the splendid plans and goals you wish; you can learn all sorts of strategies but you must have skill and hone that skill over time to become the best at what you do.

As Benjamin Hardy has observed: “When you’re confident about what you do and clear about where you’re going, the right strategy will make itself known. Hence, when your “why” is strong, you’ll figure out “how.”

“The how comes from the why. Not the other way around.”

As Jim Rohn said, “Work hard at your job and you can make a living. Work hard on yourself and you can make a fortune.”

You must take the initiative. You must create. You must ask questions, learn, refine your understanding and develop your abilities. The more capable you become the more valuable you are to others, including those who pay your wages.

Honing your skills means to constantly improve them. Improve the way you do what you do. Learn from others who have achieved success. Seek out and learn the latest techniques. If they are useful learn the latest technologies.

You cannot move forward by standing still. You cannot ever be satisfied with your current abilities. You must constantly improve. That is how you become the best at what you do. Not by doing the same thing over and over – but by doing it better over and over.

Learn how you can achieve more, become better at what you do, and realize your goals in my book, The Success Essentials.

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

Grit – The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

A Book Review by Daniel R. Murphy

Title and Author:   Grit – The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

Synopsis of Content:  

Angela Duckworth, PhD, is a psychologist who has studied what single factor is most important to success. She studied people engaged in high performance activities including business people, spelling bee contestants, Olympic athletes, West Point cadets, students in various educational institutions and many other situations where high performance is required in highly competitive situations. Her research is vigorous.

She learned that two factors are most important to attain success in all these situations. They are passion and perseverance – what she calls grit.

Duckworth found that grit was more important than background, intelligence, talent, looks, past performance, and a number of other factors commonly associated with success. It is not that these other factors are not important. It is that grit is the most important. People with grit who may have less talent or IQ than their competitors come out on top if they have sufficient grit. Likewise people with talent and intelligence often do not do as well if they lack grit.

Grit means a strong and sustained passion or desire to excel. It also requires the willingness to work very hard over a long period of time, not weeks or months, but years, to attain a goal. This combination of passion and perseverance creates the greatest likelihood for success.

What I found useful about this book:

The author’s research and case studies clearly illustrate how grit is the primary factor in success for most people in most situations. It provides a blue print for what it takes to succeed with or without extraordinary talent.

Readability/Writing Quality:  

The book is exceptionally well written and easy to read.

Notes on Author:   

Angela Duckworth, PhD, is a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the Univ. of Pennsylvania. She has a BA in neurobiology from Harvard, a MSc in neuroscience at Oxford and PhD in psychology from the Univ. of Pennsylvania. She was also an award winning teacher.

Other Books by This Author:

None.

Related Website:   

http://angeladuckworth.com/

Three Great Ideas You Can Use:  

  1. The single greatest factor in success at any endeavor is grit – the sustained passion to achieve combined with hard work over long periods of time.
  2. Passion can be generated. People can find what they truly want to achieve and dedicate themselves to the pursuit of that success.
  3. Sustained hard work over long periods of time can overcome limitations and help achieve any goal if one is willing to keep at it long enough and with sufficient dedication.

Publication Information:  

Title and Author: Grit – The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth
Copyright holder: ©2016 by Angela Duckworth
Publisher: Scribner, Simon & Schuster, Inc.

The September 2016 Book of the Month

Buy the book here.

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

The Excellence Habit – How Small Changes in Our Mindset Can Make a Big Difference in Our Lives by Vlad Zachary

Book Review by Daniel R. Murphy

Title and Author:   

The Excellence Habit – How Small Changes in Our Mindset Can Make a Big Difference in Our Lives by Vlad Zachary

Synopsis of Content:  

This book is about becoming better: it is about performing at a higher level, excelling, and achieving more. It is about overcoming barriers both real and perceived. It will inspire and it will teach.

Zachary uses real life case histories and research to show how people have overcome obstacles to their success and achieved more. He then translates that into basic principles that will help you do the same.

Excellence is the key to achieving more. Make excellence your habit and you will succeed. That is his message. The author argues that the main source of success is excellence, and that excellence depends on our internal circumstances, grit, determination and discipline. Excellence Is a process we use to attain a result and that result is success.

Zachary frames the excellence habit in terms of three principles he calls The Iceberg Principle, The Law of Not Selling Out and the Journey Mindset. He allows that luck plays a role in our success but does not dictate it. If we practice more, practice better and do the right things luck usually follows.

The Three Principles of Excellence

The Iceberg Principle is that any success comes from an extraordinary amount of work. It is all that work behind the scenes that lead to achievement. We only see what people achieve, we do not see the immense amount of work and discipline it took to get there.

The Law of Not Selling Out is about setting high standards and goals and then sticking to them no matter what happens. It is about sticking to our core values no matter what happens.

The Journey Mindset is about plotting a path to where we want to get and then following that path. It is a journey, as is life itself.

What I found useful about this book:

The book is inspiring for sure but more than that it provides a real framework for changing the way we think such that we do succeed. It lays out clear principles that we must stick to in order to succeed.

Readability/Writing Quality:  

The book is well written and well organized. It is easy to read.

Notes on Author:  

Vlad Zachary grew up in Bulgaria where he obtained his education as a journalist. He then worked in Africa and learned about being an entrepreneur. He came the US and obtained an MBA from Babson. He founded Pingwyn, a mobile based business.

Related Website:   

http:// www.vladzachary.com/

Three Great Ideas You Can Use:  

  1. The need for continuous change is at the heart of the Excellence Habit.
  2. Excellence comes from hard work and discipline.
  3. Excellence comes from learning what you must do to achieve your goals and then working hard to achieve them and sticking to your principles and your plan.

Publication Information:  

Title and Author: The Excellence Habit by Vlad Zachary
Copyright holder: ©2015 by Vlad Zachary
Publisher: Central Street Publications

This was originally published as our Book of the Month for August 2016

Get the book here.

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com

7 Strategies for Wealth and Happiness by Jim Rohn

Book Review by Daniel R. Murphy

Title and Author:  7 Strategies for Wealth and Happiness by Jim Rohn

Synopsis of Content:

7 Strategies is Rohn’s synopsis of his complete philosophy as it applies to wealth and happiness. He found the two inextricable. One could not likely find true happiness without some financial success and if done right, the pursuit of financial success can be fulfilling.

Rohn sets forth his core philosophy here of the fundamentals. He teaches you how to unleash the power of goals, the importance of continually seeking knowledge and why this is critical, and the need to learn how to change.

He teaches the importance of controlling your finances, mastering how you use your time, the importance of surrounding yourself with winners rather than whiners, and the art of living well.

In a mere 156 pages Rohn discusses all the fundamental skills, habits and beliefs that are required to succeed with money and to be happy. His last chapter, on living well, focuses on how to be happy without constantly seeking more.

This book is the summation of a lifelong search for the fundamentals, a word Rohn loved to use, which are essential to the genuinely good life.

Readability/Writing Quality:  

This is a very readable book. Rohn’s style is conversational, much like his audio presentations, and yet is concise.

Notes on Author:

Jim Rohn loved to talk about how he started in life as a humble farm boy in Idaho and came to be rich and famous. At 26 he was broke and going nowhere fast. He teaches how his first mentor, Mr. Earl Shoaf, began his education on these fundamentals. For over 40 years Rohn learned more and more about success and building wealth. He spent those years teaching what he learned to thousands of audiences and millions of people through an exhausting speaking schedule around the world, through his small books and mostly through is famous audio programs. Many of today’s success authors such as Anthony Robbins and Success Magazine editor Darren Hardy got their start studying under Rohn.

Three Great Ideas You Can Use:

  1. Surround yourself with people who will not tolerate mediocrity. Associate with people who are successful and who strive for success and improvement. This association will have a great influence upon you.
  2. Follow the wise words of Rohn’s mentor, Mr. Shoaf, who said, if you want to be successful study success; if you want to make money study the acquisition of wealth; if you want to be happy study people who are happy. Only by continuous learning do you open the doors of success.
  3. If you want to be wealthy and happy learn this well: learn to work harder on yourself than you do on your job.

Publication Information:  

7 Strategies for Wealth and Happiness by Jim Rohn

(c) 1985, 1996 by Jim Rohn

Published by Prima Publishing

Learn More About Jim Rohn here.

Buy the book here:

 

Wishing you well,

Daniel R. Murphy
Educating people for building wealth, adapting to a changing future and personal development.
www.danielrmurphy.com